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Healing Your Liver: Releasing Rage and Trauma

There is a growing body of research suggesting that the liver has a role in processing emotions such as anger, bitterness, and frustration, which may seem unusual as emotions are typically associated with the brain and nervous system. The liver is responsible for metabolizing various substances in the body, including hormones and toxins, which can have an impact on emotional wellbeing. For example, if the liver is not functioning properly and is unable to effectively remove toxins from the body, this may lead to feelings of anger, irritability, or frustration. Furthermore, studies have found that individuals with liver disease may experience symptoms such as depression and anxiety, suggesting a potential link between liver function and emotional regulation.


In this blog post I will discuss:

- the role of your liver and lymphatic system in processing and releasing anger

- how unresolved trauma creates internalised anger i.e shame

- how this anger affects our hormones, our nervous system and our health

- why unresolved anger makes us stagnant in our personal life and careers

- how to safely connect to deep anger within the liver and nervous system

- how to validate your own anger and accept it

- how to release anger and transmute this energy of fire to sacred rage


As always if you need support to heal please reach out to me


The Mighty Liver- Your Unsung Hero

The liver is a truly remarkable organ that performs an array of functions essential to our well-being. It is the body's largest internal organ and has a weighty responsibility of filtering nearly 1.5 liters of blood every minute, removing toxins, and breaking down waste products. But that's not all - the liver also produces bile, a greenish-yellow fluid that helps us digest fats, regulates blood sugar levels, and stores important vitamins and minerals that are essential for our health. It's like a busy chemical factory that never shuts down, working tirelessly to keep our bodies functioning smoothly.


If we dwell in feelings of anger and resentment, our liver can start overproducing bile. This bile is often what comes up during purges with healing approaches such as Kambo and Ayahuasca where the association between buried emotions and the body's physiological response becomes very apparent.


Moreover, the liver's ability to regenerate itself is nothing short of astounding. It can grow back up to its full size even if up to 75% of it is removed or damaged. This unique feature has made it a subject of fascination for scientists and researchers worldwide, as they try to uncover the secrets of its regenerative powers. This means it is always possible for you to heal your liver!


Here's what one of my client's experienced during their healing programme where they were releasing the pain of their childhood trauma.

"I learned to love all of me, my victimhood, the part of me that hurts myself. We realigned my hips, we straightened my spine, healed the liver, the black hole in my stomach. There was so much processing in my liver, such deep pain and releasing from it. Rivers were running through my kidneys, flushing through. I am now feeling very calm and peaceful. I disentangled myself from my parents and their trauma that they were working out on me. I cleared my space and found stillness and peace, and learned that I always have access to this. This cleared my skin from being raw all the time and not understanding why. I learned to be thankful for my body for showing me what I was not ready to look at, emotionally, mentally and spiritually. We cleared a blockage on my third eye, giving me a while new level of clarity. I really learned to be open and fearless, in my work with Safa. She showed me that I am always safe, held and supported. I am at peace with what has happened, not carrying it into my new experiences.​"


The liver is also closely linked to our emotional and mental health. It is believed to be a storehouse of emotions, particularly those related to frustration, anger, and resentment. This connection between the liver and our emotional well-being is being increasingly studied by health professionals, and new research is shedding light on the fascinating ways in which our liver is interconnected with our overall health and happiness.




The Role of the Liver in Emotional Regulation and Detoxification

The liver is a vital organ that performs a wide range of functions essential to our overall health. While most people are aware of its role in filtering blood and processing nutrients, recent studies have revealed that the liver also plays a key role in our emotional well-being.


One of the liver's main functions is detoxification, the process of breaking down and eliminating harmful substances from the body. Some studies have suggested that this process may also be linked to emotional health. For example, a study published in the journal Current Opinion in Psychiatry found that the liver may be involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters, the chemical messengers in the brain that regulate mood and emotion. The study suggests that a malfunctioning liver could potentially lead to imbalances in neurotransmitters, which could in turn contribute to conditions such as depression and anxiety.


Another study published in the journal Clinical Psychology Review suggests that the liver may also play a role in the regulation of the stress hormone cortisol. Cortisol is released by the body in response to stress, and prolonged exposure to high levels of cortisol can have negative effects on physical and mental health. This is very common in adults who have unresolved trauma and nervous system dysregulation. The study suggests that the liver may be involved in breaking down cortisol and eliminating it from the body, and that a healthy liver may therefore be important for maintaining a healthy stress response.


In addition to its role in detoxification and hormone regulation, the liver is also involved in the production of bile, a substance that helps to break down fats and absorb nutrients from food. Studies have suggested that the liver may also be involved in the regulation of blood sugar levels, which can have an impact on mood and energy levels. For example, a study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry found that people with depression were more likely to have abnormal glucose metabolism, suggesting a possible link between liver function and mood disorders. The liver has a key role in these 4 areas below which directly impact our emotional and mental well-being


  1. Metabolism of neurotransmitters, the chemical messengers in the brain that regulate mood and emotion

  2. Detoxification, the process of breaking down and eliminating harmful substances (and emotions) from the body and brain

  3. Regulation of the stress hormone cortisol which has a key role in our nervous system regulation

  4. Glucose metabolism and regulation of blood sugar levels, which can have a direct impact on mood and energy levels.


Detoxification, te Lymphatic System, and the Liver in Physical and Emotional Health


The process of detoxification is essential for maintaining good physical health, but it also plays a crucial role in our emotional health. Our body is exposed to a variety of toxins every day, including environmental pollutants, processed foods, and alcohol, which can build up and cause harm to our organs, including the liver.


When our liver is unable to effectively remove toxins from our body, it can lead to an accumulation of harmful substances, which may contribute to emotional disturbances such as anxiety, depression, and irritability. This is because these toxins can disrupt the delicate balance of neurotransmitters in our brain, which are responsible for regulating our moods and emotions.


The lymphatic system also plays an important role in maintaining the body's fluid balance. Lymphatic vessels collect excess fluid from tissues and return it to the bloodstream.


The lymphatic system and liver interact in several ways. The liver produces lymph and secretes it into the lymphatic vessels. This lymph, which contains proteins and other substances, is then transported by the lymphatic vessels to the lymph nodes, where it is filtered and processed by immune cells. The lymphatic vessels then return the lymph to the bloodstream, and it is eventually circulated back to the liver.


The liver also plays an important role in maintaining the health of the lymphatic system. It produces bile, a fluid that helps to break down fats in the digestive system. Bile is transported from the liver to the gallbladder and eventually released into the small intestine. The lymphatic system helps to transport some of the components of bile, such as cholesterol and other lipids, back to the liver for processing.


Furthermore, the liver is responsible for filtering and removing toxins from the blood. When the liver is unable to effectively remove these toxins, it can lead to a buildup of harmful substances in the body, which can damage the lymphatic vessels and impair the immune system's ability to function properly.


In summary, the lymphatic system and liver are closely interconnected. The liver produces lymph and plays an important role in processing and filtering components of bile, which are transported by the lymphatic system. The liver is also responsible for removing toxins from the body, which can have an impact on the health and function of the lymphatic system.




20 Things That Harm Your Liver


Here are 20 things that can damage the liver:

  1. Alcohol Consumption: Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to liver damage, such as fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, and cirrhosis.

  2. Hepatitis B and C: These viral infections can cause inflammation and damage to liver cells.

  3. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD): This condition occurs when fat accumulates in the liver, which can lead to inflammation and damage to liver cells.

  4. Obesity: Being overweight or obese can increase the risk of developing NAFLD and other liver diseases.

  5. Diabetes: People with diabetes are more likely to develop NAFLD and other liver diseases.

  6. High Cholesterol: High levels of cholesterol can cause fat accumulation in the liver, which can lead to inflammation and damage to liver cells.

  7. Medications: Certain medications, such as acetaminophen, can cause liver damage when taken in excessive amounts.

  8. Industrial Chemicals: Exposure to certain chemicals in the workplace or environment can lead to liver damage.

  9. Viral Infections: Other viruses, such as Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus, can cause inflammation and damage to liver cells.

  10. Autoimmune Diseases: Autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis, can cause inflammation and damage to liver cells.

  11. Genetics: Certain genetic mutations can increase the risk of developing liver diseases.

  12. Overeating: Consuming too much food can lead to obesity and increase the risk of developing NAFLD and other liver diseases.

  13. Lack of Exercise: Not getting enough physical activity can contribute to obesity and increase the risk of developing liver diseases.

  14. Smoking: Smoking can increase the risk of developing liver cancer and other liver diseases.

  15. Exposure to Toxins: Exposure to toxins such as pesticides, heavy metals, and solvents can cause liver damage.

  16. Poor Nutrition: Eating a diet that is high in fat, sugar, and processed foods can contribute to the development of liver diseases.

  17. Sleep Apnea: Sleep apnea has been linked to the development of NAFLD and other liver diseases.

  18. High Blood Pressure: High blood pressure can contribute to the development of NAFLD and other liver diseases.

  19. Steroid Use: Long-term use of anabolic steroids can cause liver damage.

  20. Unprotected Sex: Unprotected sex can increase the risk of contracting hepatitis B and C, which can cause liver damage.


The Relationship Between the Liver and Our Emotional Flow

The liver plays a significant role in regulating our emotional flow. It is responsible for processing toxins in our body, but it also has a profound intelligence that is connected to the rest of the body.


The liver is connected to the gut-liver axis, which is a direct pathway between the gut and the liver. When toxins enter our body, they can disrupt the gut-liver axis and cause cellular stress and inflammation in the liver cells.


A big part of our liver's role is to help the body drain physically, emotionally and energetically. Drainage is super important and so is being able to let go of emotions that no longer serve us. Drainage is therefore key to allowing flow or movement, and movement is central to being alive and not dead. Flow includes cerebrospinal fluid, lymph, blood as well as emotions, perception, ideas, inspiration and creativity. Everything is supposed to move and flow.



How Unresolved Anger Makes Us Stagnant


Stagnation and feeling stuck can also have a profound impact on our physical health, particularly on the liver and hormonal balance. This is especially true when it feels like we've been stuck for many years in the same place.


Trauma and emotional stress can cause the liver to become congested and sluggish, impeding its ability to detoxify the body and leading to an accumulation of toxins. This buildup of toxins can then disrupt the hormonal balance, as the liver is responsible for metabolizing and eliminating hormones from the body.


Additionally, chronic stress and emotional stagnation can cause imbalances in the production of cortisol, a hormone released by the adrenal glands in response to stress. When cortisol levels are consistently high due to chronic stress, it can lead to hormonal imbalances and a host of negative health effects, including weight gain, insomnia, and even depression.


Therefore, it's important to not only address the emotional and mental aspects of being stuck and stagnant but also to support the liver's natural detoxification processes and hormonal balance.


Listen to: What to do if you're feeling stuck Procrastination, fear and flow states How to get unstuck and create momentum fast


Anger & Serotonin: The Biochemistry of Anger

Biochemistry of anger refers to the physiological and chemical changes that occur in the body dur

ing an angry episode. When we become angry, our body releases a cascade of stress hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol, which trigger the "fight or flight" response. This response prepares the body to take action by increasing heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing rate.


The neurotransmitter serotonin, which is often associated with feelings of well-being and happiness, also plays a role in anger. Studies have found that individuals with liver disease may have lower levels of serotonin in the brain, which can lead to symptoms of depression and anxiety. Low levels of serotonin have been linked to increased aggression and irritability.


There are several other biochemical factors that can contribute to anger, such as:

  1. Low blood sugar levels: When blood sugar levels drop too low, a person may experience irritability and anger.

  2. Dehydration: Dehydration can cause fatigue and irritability, which may lead to anger.

  3. Lack of sleep: Sleep deprivation can lead to irritability, mood swings, and increased aggression.

  4. Imbalances in brain chemicals: Imbalances in neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been linked to anger and aggression.

  5. Hormonal changes: Changes in hormone levels, such as during PMS or menopause, can lead to mood swings and irritability.


Why Are We So Afraid of Expressing Anger?

Many people are scared of their own anger because they view it as a negative and destructive emotion. They may believe that expressing their anger will lead to conflict or harm to themselves or others. They may also fear that their anger is a sign of weakness or lack of control, and worry about the consequences of losing their composure.


Another reason why people are scared of their own anger is that they may have learned from their family or culture that expressing anger is not acceptable or is even dangerous. They may have grown up in an environment where anger was suppressed or ignored, or where it was expressed in unhealthy or violent ways.


Additionally, some people may have experienced trauma or abuse in the past, which can make them feel scared or overwhelmed by their anger. They may fear that expressing their anger will lead to further harm or retraumatization.


Ultimately, fear of anger is often rooted in a lack of understanding and acceptance of this natural emotion. It's important to learn to accept and validate our anger, and to find healthy ways to express and channel it. Seeking support from a therapist or trusted friend can also help us explore and work through our fears and feelings around anger. You might like to read:



Childhood Trauma, Internalised Anger & Shame

When we hold unresolved anger from childhood trauma in our body, it can have various negative effects on our physical and mental health. The body's stress response is triggered, leading to the release of stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. These hormones can cause inflammation and oxidative stress in the body, leading to damage to our organs and tissues. When we have unprocessed anger we often internalise it and it creates a deep shame within. This leads to constant insecurity, low self worth and self doubt. It is very common amongst survivors of childhood trauma.


In particular, unresolved anger can have a significant impact on the liver, as it is responsible for processing and eliminating toxins from the body. The liver may become overburdened with the increased levels of stress hormones and toxins, leading to inflammation and damage to liver cells. This internalised anger can also have negative effects on our mental health, leading to symptoms like anxiety and depression. Chronic anger can lead to feelings of helplessness, which can further exacerbate these mental health conditions. This can impact not just our health but our family life and career. Holding onto unresolved anger can lead to difficulties in interpersonal relationships with friends, our children, our partners as well as problems with communication and boundaries. It can lead to constantly self sacrificing and putting other people's needs first whilst neglecting your own, i.e people pleasing.


It is important to address and process unresolved anger from childhood trauma in a healthy and constructive way and reintegrate the nervous system through somatic therapy and other powerful healing modalities as well as your own embodied healing practices (you'll find these on my podcast)


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How the Liver Helps us Release Anger

The liver is closely linked to the emotion of anger in Chinese medicine, as it is responsible for producing heat energy to help us break free from negative emotions and situations. When we feel trapped or stuck, we often experience anger as a way to discharge the energy needed to break free. However, suppressing this anger can lead to stagnation and blockages in the liver, preventing emotional flow and causing feelings of frustration and powerlessness.

In order to break free from our own self-imposed limitations, we need to grow both deeper into ourselves and beyond our current situation. This growth requires the discharge of energy, which can be released through the emotion of anger. The liver works tirelessly to help us break free from negative emotions and situations, generating heat energy to support this process.

However, when we suppress our anger and hold onto negative emotions, the energy remains stagnant and prevents us from experiencing growth and expansion. This can leave us feeling small and powerless, which can further frustrate our inner warrior - the liver.

Understanding the natural process of growth and expansion and the role of anger as a release of energy can be helpful when working with clients. Encouraging the expression of anger can allow for the discharge of stagnant energy and prepare the body for growth and expansion. Suppressing anger can lead to the suppression of growth and further blockages in the liver, hindering emotional flow and causing feelings of frustration and powerlessness.


You might like to listen to:

How to crush negativity and create a winners mindset

What to do if you're feeling stuck

Procrastination, fear and flow states


How to Safely Release Anger and Heal Your Liver

The first step in acknowledging your emotions and validating them as a natural response to what you have experienced is reassuring your body and cells that you are no longer in that situation and that it is safe to express your emotions. This process can take time, especially if you have been suppressing your emotions for years in order to appear strong. Acknowledging anger can be a significant internal shift for you, and may lead to a range of other emotions such as guilt, self-hatred, and feelings of weakness or failure. It is important to support yourself through this process and understand that experiencing and expressing your emotions is not a sign of weakness, but rather a necessary step in healing and growth.




1) How to Connect to the Anger in Your Body

Somatic body mapping is a powerful practice for connecting to the anger stored in your body. Here are some steps to guide you through the process:

  1. Find a quiet, comfortable space where you can focus on your body without distraction.

  2. Begin by taking a few deep breaths and grounding yourself in the present moment.

  3. Focus your attention on the sensations in your body. Where do you feel tension, tightness, or discomfort?

  4. Use your hands to map out these sensations on your body, tracing the areas where you feel anger and tension.

  5. Once you have mapped out the areas where anger is stored, take some time to explore these areas with your hands. Notice the texture, temperature, and any other sensations you experience.

  6. As you explore these areas, allow yourself to feel the anger that is stored there. It's okay to feel uncomfortable or even overwhelmed - this is a natural part of the process.

  7. Take some deep breaths and visualize yourself releasing the anger and tension from your body.

  8. Finish the practice by taking some time to rest and reflect on the experience.

By practicing somatic body mapping, you can deepen your awareness of the anger stored in your body and learn to release it in a healthy, productive way. Remember to approach the practice with curiosity and compassion, and to seek support if you need it.



You might like to try the above Somatic Body Mapping Practice or this Step by step process to identify buried emotional pain


2) How To Accept & Validate Your Anger

As individuals, the process of acknowledging and validating our anger can be challenging, especially if we have experienced childhood trauma or have a history of suppressing our emotions. It is essential for us to create a safe and non-judgmental space to allow our emotions to surface gradually. We may also need to use different techniques such as breathing exercises, meditation, or somatic therapies to help us connect with our emotional body. Our liver plays a crucial role in this process as it is responsible for processing and eliminating toxins, including the negative emotions that are associated with anger. When we suppress our anger or other emotions, it can create an imbalance in our body, leading to hormonal imbalances and other health issues. Our liver may become overloaded with toxins, leading to inflammation and damage over time. By acknowledging and validating our anger, we can release the emotional burden that we have been carrying for years. This can help to restore balance to our body and allow our liver to function optimally. As a result, we may experience improved emotional well-being, better hormonal balance, and overall better health. Recognize that anger is a valid emotion - It's important to acknowledge that anger is a natural response to certain situations and is a valid emotion to feel.

  1. Allow yourself to feel your anger - Don't suppress or ignore your anger. Allow yourself to fully experience and express your emotions in a healthy way.

  2. Avoid judging yourself for feeling angry - Try not to judge or criticize yourself for feeling angry. Instead, offer yourself compassion and understanding.

  3. Express your anger in a healthy way - Find healthy outlets to express your anger, such as through physical activity, creative expression, or communication with others.

  4. Practice self-compassion - Be kind to yourself when you're feeling angry. Recognize that you're human and that it's okay to have emotions.

  5. Seek support - It's okay to seek support from others when you're feeling angry. Talk to a trusted friend, family member, or therapist for guidance and support.

  6. Take responsibility for your anger - While it's important to accept and validate your anger, it's also important to take responsibility for how you express it and how it affects others.



3) How to Start Safely Releasing Your Anger

When we experience childhood trauma and don't have the opportunity to process and release our anger in a healthy way, it can stay trapped in our bodies and manifest as physical and emotional issues later on in life. In order to release this trapped anger, it's important to create a safe and supportive space for ourselves where we can feel and express our anger without fear of judgment or retribution.


When anger is allowed to be expressed and processed in a safe space, it can dissipate relatively quickly. This releases the tension and stress held in the body and creates more space for balance and harmony to be restored. Creating a safe space for anger processing and release is an essential aspect of healing from childhood trauma and cultivating emotional wellbeing.


As a somatic therapist and healer, creating this safe container for clients to process their anger is crucial. It requires patience, empathy, and a deep understanding of the client's needs and emotions and profound stillness. There needs to be no consequence for the release of this pain and anger and no judgement. It's common for the mind to jump in and try to rationalize or suppress the sensation of anger, but it's important to encourage clients to allow themselves to fully feel and express their anger in a safe and controlled manner. Please reach out to me if you'd like support to heal and release anger.


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4) Transmuting Anger to Sacred Rage

When we talk about sacred rage, we're referring to the idea that energy within anger that can be a powerful and transformative force and can be harnessed to create positive change.

This is the element of fire!


When we repress our anger the fire is also subdued, we find it difficult to move forward, to bring energy and passion. and conviction to anything that we do. You may have heard that phrase 'being on fire' and maybe you even remember a time when you were, quite literally fuelled with energy, passion and purpose. The fire within you was lit. That's because you were channeling your energy not into suppressing your anger and shaming yourself but into creating something new! This is vital life force energy that is being transmuted when we heal anger and embrace sacred rage. This is what turns anger from an armour / protection mechanism to a fuel for creativity and conenction.


One way to channel sacred rage is through physical activities that allow us to release pent-up energy and emotion. This can include activities like dancing, running, or practicing martial arts. Exercise has been shown to help regulate emotions and reduce feelings of anger and frustration.


Another way to channel sacred rage is through creative expression, such as writing or art. This can be a powerful way to tap into the emotions that are fueling our anger and transform them into something positive and constructive.

Vocalizing and screaming can also be a helpful outlet for sacred rage. Letting out a primal scream can release tension and pent-up energy, allowing us to feel more grounded and centered. It's important to find a safe and non-destructive outlet for sacred rage. Engaging in destructive behaviors like lashing out at others, self-harm, or substance abuse will only lead to further negative consequences.


By channeling our sacred rage in a healthy way, we can use its energy to fuel positive change in our lives and the world around us. We can become more empowered to stand up for ourselves and others, to make changes that are needed, and to create a more just and compassionate world.




What Clients Say

Here's what one of my client's experienced during their healing programme where they were releasing the pain of their childhood trauma.

"I learned to love all of me, my victimhood, the part of me that hurts myself. We realigned my hips, we straightened my spine, healed the liver, the black hole in my stomach. There was so much processing in my liver, such deep pain and releasing from it. Rivers were running through my kidneys, flushing through. I am now feeling very calm and peaceful. I disentangled myself from my parents and their trauma that they were working out on me. I cleared my space and found stillness and peace, and learned that I always have access to this. This cleared my skin from being raw all the time and not understanding why. I learned to be thankful for my body for showing me what I was not ready to look at, emotionally, mentally and spiritually. We cleared a blockage on my third eye, giving me a while new level of clarity. I really learned to be open and fearless, in my work with Safa. She showed me that I am always safe, held and supported. I am at peace with what has happened, not carrying it into my new experiences.​"



Here are 10 ways to channel your anger into sacred rage:

  1. Let it out through physical activity - kickboxing, martial arts, or intense workouts can help release pent-up tension and transform anger into productive energy.

  2. Get creative and express yourself - channel your emotions into art, music, or dance and create something beautiful out of your rage.

  3. Find inner peace through mindfulness and meditation - use these practices to become more aware of your emotions and find a sense of calm amidst the chaos.

  4. Connect with nature - immerse yourself in the beauty of the outdoors and use the healing power of nature to ground yourself and gain perspective.

  5. Seek support from others - connect with friends, family, or a therapist to process your emotions and gain insights on how to channel them in a positive direction.

  6. Prioritize self-care - take care of yourself by engaging in activities that bring you joy, such as hobbies or self-care rituals, and make sure to get enough sleep and nourishing food.

  7. Be an agent of change through activism - use your anger to fight for social justice, environmental causes, or any other issues that ignite your passion.

  8. Practice forgiveness - release anger by letting go of grudges and choosing to forgive those who have wronged you.

  9. Cultivate gratitude - focus on the good in your life and channel your energy into positive thoughts and actions.

  10. Use your voice to speak up and be heard - channel your anger into activism, advocacy, or simply asserting your boundaries and standing up for yourself. Your voice can be a powerful tool for change.



Inspiring Quotes on Sacred Rage

  1. "Sacred rage is not about destruction, but transformation. It is about taking the energy of anger and using it to create a better world." - Eve Ensler

  2. "We need to let our sacred rage out to fuel our work in the world, to speak up against oppression, to demand justice." - Bell Hooks

  3. "Anger is not something to be feared or suppressed. It is a natural and valid emotion that can be channeled into sacred rage for positive change." - John O'Donohue

  4. "We must embrace our anger and transform it into sacred rage, using it to fight against injustice and create a more equitable world for all." - Gloria Steinem

  5. "Sacred rage is not about being violent or aggressive, but about standing up for what is right and using our anger as a force for positive change." - Rachel Naomi Remen



Want to Help Your Clients With Deeper Emotional Releases? Enrol Today!

2 month Online Masterclass in Organ Healing

The liver is our most loyal warrior. It's the only organ in our body that will regrow itself when it gets taken down in battle. The liver is too busy to talk but when we overload ourselves with toxic situations, food, thoughts, environments and emotions it will find it harder to fight. After all it's protecting us and we're trying to destroy it. The liver shows us when we are getting in our own way, giving ourselves a battle to fight that we simply could allow to drain away. The balance between holding on and letting go is a constant dance between identity and annihilation and the liver plays a key role in that.



20 Ways to Improve Your Liver Health here are 20 ways to improve your liver health:

  1. Reduce alcohol consumption: Alcohol is processed by the liver, and excessive consumption can damage liver cells.

  2. Eat a healthy diet: A balanced diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables can help provide essential nutrients that support liver function.

  3. Drink plenty of water: Staying hydrated helps the liver perform its many functions, including filtering toxins from the body.

  4. Maintain a healthy weight: Obesity and excess body fat can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can cause liver damage.

  5. Exercise regularly: Regular exercise can help maintain a healthy weight, reduce inflammation, and improve overall liver function.

  6. Quit smoking: Smoking exposes the liver to harmful chemicals and toxins, which can cause damage over time.

  7. Avoid processed foods: Processed foods are often high in sugar, salt, and unhealthy fats, which can contribute to liver damage.

  8. Limit intake of high-fat foods: Consuming too much fat can lead to the accumulation of fat in the liver, which can cause liver damage.

  9. Choose whole grains: Whole grains provide important nutrients and fiber that support liver function.

  10. Incorporate healthy fats: Healthy fats, such as those found in avocados and nuts, can support liver health.

  11. Reduce salt intake: Too much salt can cause the body to retain water, which can lead to liver damage.

  12. Manage stress: Stress can increase inflammation and contribute to liver damage.

  13. Get enough sleep: Lack of sleep can contribute to liver damage and increase the risk of developing liver disease.

  14. Practice safe sex: Hepatitis B and C can be transmitted through sexual contact and can cause liver damage.

  15. Practice good hygiene: Hepatitis A can be transmitted through poor hygiene practices, so it's important to wash hands regularly and avoid sharing personal items.

  16. Avoid exposure to toxins: Certain chemicals, such as cleaning products and pesticides, can be harmful to the liver. Use protective gear when handling these substances.

  17. Follow medication instructions: Certain medications can be harmful to the liver if not taken correctly. Always follow medication instructions and talk to your doctor if you have concerns.

  18. Limit caffeine intake: Consuming too much caffeine can put extra stress on the liver and lead to liver damage.

  19. Drink green tea: Green tea contains compounds that can help protect the liver and promote liver health.

  20. Consider liver support supplements: Some supplements, such as milk thistle, can support liver health and function. However, it's important to talk to a healthcare professional before starting any supplements.



Herbs to Support Liver Health

There are many herbs that can help support liver health and promote healing. Here are some examples:

  1. Milk Thistle: One of the most well-known and widely used herbs for liver health. It contains a compound called silymarin, which has been shown to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can help protect and repair liver cells.

  2. Dandelion: A powerful herb that has been used for centuries to support liver health. It can help increase bile production, which aids in digestion and helps to eliminate toxins from the body.

  3. Turmeric: A spice that is commonly used in cooking, turmeric contains a compound called curcumin which has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that can benefit liver health.

  4. Schisandra: A traditional Chinese herb that has been used for centuries to support liver function. It contains compounds called lignans which can help protect liver cells from damage and improve liver function.

  5. Licorice Root: An herb commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine, licorice root has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that can benefit liver health.

  6. Artichoke: Contains a compound called cynarin which can help increase bile production and aid in digestion, as well as protect liver cells from damage.

  7. Ginger: A root commonly used in cooking, ginger has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that can help protect liver cells from damage and improve liver function.

  8. Chicory: Contains compounds called phenolics which can help protect liver cells from damage and improve liver function.

  9. Burdock Root: A root commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine, burdock root can help improve liver function and aid in the elimination of toxins from the body.

  10. Yellow Dock: Contains compounds called anthraquinones which can help stimulate bile production and aid in digestion, as well as support liver health.



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