• Safa

The interconnected dynamic nature of our anatomy

The principle of craniosacral work is the interconnected and dynamic nature of everything in the body. Our muscles, bones, fascia, vessels, organs, glands and nervous system effectively function as one entire system, in constant communication and collaboration to maintain balance.


The connective tissue or fascia in our body is an important part of the system and runs as a continuous network from head to toe. The dural membrane system is continuous with the periosteum (or inner lining) of the cranium bones and the sacrum and also the cranial and sacral nerves which are enveloped in the same membrane (epineurium) and form the parasympathetic nervous system. As it’s continuous it is inherently related, influencing and influenced by these structures.


Working to release restrictions and patterns of tension in membranes locally has an effect therefore not just on the whole system due to the continuous nature of the fibres, but can also release nerves which have become compromised or impinged.

Furthermore dural membrane folds in on itself intricately creating venous sinuses in the membrane layer surrounding the brain; they form an important role in draining blood from the cortex and reabsorbing CSF.


In this way working with a craniosacral therapist to release constrictions in the dural membrane either caused by injury, birth trauma, emotional tension, postural imbalances, inflammation etc can support the necessary flow of vital fluids in the body, nourishing tissues organs and the entire nervous system. It directly affects the drainage of the entire system as well as physical structures in the body such as the membranes, organs and bones.

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